THE ADVANTAGES OF VOLUNTARY BENEFITS

Benefits can have a significant impact on employers’ ability to retain staff, according to a study by Harvard Business Review Analytics Services. To maximize this advantage, employers are expanding their benefit packages beyond traditional offerings such as health insurance to include a range of voluntary benefits

Voluntary benefits programs may also be referred to as employee-paid benefits or supplemental insurance. Employees have the option to choose (or “volunteer”) to purchase these benefits. Some examples of popular voluntary benefits are life insurance, dental plans, critical illness insurance, and legal insurance plans.

Voluntary benefits can offer a number of unique advantages to both employers and employees.

Because the coverage included in your group’s U.S. Legal Services legal insurance plan may vary, please check with your group’s administrator for specific benefit details.

Why Voluntary Benefits Are Good for Employers

Cost-effectiveness: Voluntary benefits can be provided to employees at little or no cost to employers, allowing companies to offer a wider range of benefits.

Broad appeal: As workforce diversity continues to increase, voluntary benefits can help meet the varied needs of employees of all ages and in all stages of their careers.

Complements existing benefits: Voluntary programs can help bridge the gaps for companies that want to make their overall benefits offering more attractive to top prospective employees. These benefits can help level the playing field for smaller companies that are competing for talent.

Meets the demands for “well-being” benefits: The new generation of employees wants benefits that support their financial and personal well-being.

Simple administration: Many providers of voluntary benefits have simplified administrative tasks and requirements, and often offer online access to program management. They also may offer assistance in introducing employees to the program and provide ongoing customer support.

Less absenteeism: When employees have easy access to the services that voluntary benefits provide, employees don’t have to spend time seeking those services on their own.

Voluntary Benefit Advantages to Employees

Lower costs: Voluntary benefits and services offer employees a lower-risk way to reduce out-of-pocket expenses. Many of these services cost less when accessed through voluntary benefit programs instead of on the open market.

Flexibility: Employees can usually select the individual voluntary benefits they want and will use, rather than having to accept a package that include types of coverage in which they may not be interested. Some voluntary benefits can even move with an employee when they change jobs.

Security: A number of voluntary benefits provide services that enhance or support employees’ security. Long-term care insurance, for example, can help older employees secure their financial future, while benefits such as legal insurance can help increase all employees’ sense of security, knowing they have valuable, expert legal help available. Identity theft benefits, which are rising in popularity, also help all employees keep their identities more secure.

Customization: When employees have optional, voluntary benefits from which to choose, they can personalize their benefits packages to suit their individual needs.

Convenience and accessibility: Voluntary benefit costs can usually be deducted from employees’ paychecks. Thanks to the rate advantage that group benefits can provide, those costs can make services that may normally be out of economic reach, such as hiring an attorney, affordable and easily accessible.

Learn More About Voluntary Benefits

Voluntary benefits can support employees’ well-being and empower them to better manage unexpected events. If you’d like to learn more about how legal benefits and identity theft protection from U.S. Legal Services can help your company attract and retain quality employees, please call us at 1-800-356-5297 or complete the form at right.

This information is provided for educational purposes only. It is not intended as legal advice. Each situation and matter is unique and should be discussed with a U.S. Legal Services network attorney.